More Than Just A Lullaby: The Benefits of Sharing Music with Your Children

More Than Just A Lullaby: The Benefits of Sharing Music with Your Children

Here’s the thing about kids and music: They’re born with it. Music is — naturally and innately — a part of us, even in the womb. Babies can hear sounds from as early as 18 weeks gestation, they’re they’re able to respond to voices and music as early as 25 weeks, and they’re born able to make and respond to musical sounds.

This is wonderful news; it means that we don’t necessarily have to “teach” music to our children — we just need to provide them opportunities to make music with us!

Forget the Resolutions: Do This One Thing Instead for Happier Parenting

Forget the Resolutions: Do This One Thing Instead for Happier Parenting

It’s that time of year again — everyone’s buzzing about resolutions. Eating healthy. Getting a gym membership. Meal planning. Budgeting. Losing the baby weight. We’re all striving for better, faster, and stronger in hopes that we’ll ultimately be happier. But all too often, we take on too much with our resolutions; life gets in the way, we don’t follow through, and we actually feel worse. Read on to see how you can improve your life simply by incorporating gratitude!

Surviving the Holidays With Little Kids:  5 Tips for Success

Surviving the Holidays With Little Kids:  5 Tips for Success

You’re probably all too familiar with the holiday rush: There are concerts, parties, recitals, sugary treats, parades, late nights, movies, extended family in town, vacation from school … and a schedule that even you can barely follow. And if you’ve got a small child (or children) in your life, it’s all the more complicated as you try and balance all the busy while also caring for little ones. Read on for tips on shepherding your little ones gracefully through this busy season.

Why Moms Might Secretly Dread the Holidays & 6 Ways to Bring Back the Joy

Why Moms Might Secretly Dread the Holidays & 6 Ways to Bring Back the Joy

So often, moms work so hard to make the holidays magical that we forget to actually enjoy them. And we do it all, year after year, because it makes our families happy—because seeing those smiles is priceless. But all too often, we also run ourselves ragged in the process! We find our patience growing thinner, our lists growing longer, and our world missing some serious joy. So this year, let’s all make a pact to stress less and bring the joy back. Read on for six tips for a more joyful, peaceful, and enjoyable holiday season.

6 Strategies to Help Your Older Child Adjust to a New Sibling

6 Strategies to Help Your Older Child Adjust to a New Sibling

Getting a younger sibling is a really big deal for children. And it’s a really big deal for a lot longer than we often think it will — or should — be. Older siblings will act out their complicated and often conflicted feelings, sometimes towards the baby and sometimes not, on an off, for months (or even years) after getting a baby brother or sister — long after we assume they’re fine and should have adjusted. Read on for six tips for help ease this monumental transition for your older child — and for your whole family.

Postpartum Depression: 10 Facts You Probably Didn't Know

Postpartum Depression: 10 Facts You Probably Didn't Know

I’m guessing you’ve heard of postpartum depression. Or you’ve at least heard people talk about “postpartum” — as in, “I had postpartum after my second baby” (usually shared in hushed tones — and often not shared at all). In fact, maybe you even struggled a little — or a lot! — after having your baby, but you didn’t think it was at a level that warranted support. (If that’s you, mama, you’re in really good company.) Here’s the thing: There’s a whole lot most of us don’t know about postpartum depression. Read on for ten lesser-known facts.

#SpeakTheSecret: Why Talking About Postpartum Depression Matters

#SpeakTheSecret: Why Talking About Postpartum Depression Matters

Most new mothers experience the “baby blues” — up to two weeks of mood swings, irritability, and general malaise after having a baby. This is because hormones are fluctuating, sleep isn’t happening, life has changed in a huge way, and mom is recovering from delivery, and maybe even surgery. The “baby blues” are the norm, even if a woman is genuinely happy in her new role as mother to this baby. And for one out of every five to seven new mothers, these painful symptoms don’t go away after two weeks; they persist, they intensify, and they make the daily activities associated with caring for a newborn extremely difficult at best — and impossible at worst. Read on to learn more about these difficulties and how we can help.

Surviving the “Baby Blues”: Six Strategies New Moms Can Use to Feel Better Today

Surviving the “Baby Blues”: Six Strategies New Moms Can Use to Feel Better Today

Becoming a mother is the biggest, most life-changing transition most women will ever encounter. It turns your entire life upside-down, and not always “in the best way possible,” as we tend to communicate on social media. For up to two weeks after your baby’s born, it’s completely normal to struggle a little. And most of us don’t share this side of new motherhood. We share the sweet baby pictures and Facebook statuses about how wonderful life is with our new addition — and while those happy moments are absolutely part of the reality of new motherhood for many of us, it’s still really, really hard. So if you just had a baby and you’re struggling more than you thought you would, take a deep breath and read on for six tips to feel a little better right now.